Theresa Sneed Comes to Visit with her Band of Fairies

Faires, wizards, and pixies, OH MY!  Welcome, welcome, to our guest this week, Theresa Sneed. In her recent release, Theresa takes us on another adventure in her SONS of ELDERBERRY Series. It’s a unique mystical world with daring adventures and a sweet romance that makes our hearts melt.

In effort to uncover this mystical writer beyond her back cover bio, I asked her to tell us a little about herself and she wasn’t shy.

What are TOP TEN THINGS we should know about Theresa Sneed?

  1. Born and raised in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine.milo-feb-2015-003
  2. Became a “ghost writer” in 3rd grade when she gave her friend a poem she had written which won first place and was published in the local newspaper under her friend’s name!
  3. Loves the outdoors – especially in New England.
  4. Strongly believes that we are all brothers and sisters and ought to treat each other as such regardless of our ethnicity, religious preference, or political affiliation.
  5. Loves, loves, loves to write and spends inordinate amounts of time in front of her computer!
  6. Loves classical music – listens to it while writng.
  7. Doesn’t mind growing old – adheres to Edgar Allen Poe’s words “All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream,” and believes that this life is for but a moment and a greater existence awaits.
  8. Deeply in love with her husband of 38 years.
  9. Wishes she knew her distant grandchildren better.
  10. Loves to read and recognizes the correlation of being an avid reader and an effective writer. Loves Stephen King’s sage advice, “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way around these two things that I’m aware of, no shortcut.”

 

We’re also lucky enough to get a sneak peek inside the covers of her recent release, SONS of ELDERBERRY and don’t miss out below on the free GIVEAWAY.

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When Elias of Elderberry introduces his best friend Jaron Finley to his magical world of fairies and castles, wizards and yōkai shape-shifters, will Jaron ever want to go back to his dull world of school and homework, especially after meeting Elieli, the fairy princess of Estraelia? It’s doubtful, but he must—the mortal that he is. Will Elias have to alter his memory and erase all that his friend has seen, or will Jaron be able to keep the secret that Elias Rey—a sophomore at PVHS, is a wizard and the youngest heir of Elderberry?

Reviews from Elias of Elderberry, Book One:

Elias of Elderberry is a truly marvelous book! The action, concept, and mysteries contained in this novel are intensely compelling and exciting. Not satisfied with simply writing an entertaining story, Sneed fills the pages with lessons about temptation, addiction, and the morals of right versus wrong. – R.L. Drembic

The Sons of Elderberry! Book One, Elias of Elderberry, was fantastic! I am eager to read the continuing sequels. Do any of us really know who we are and what our real worth is? Fifteen-year-old Elias was soon to discover things beyond his wildest imagination. This is about present day with regular school attendance, yet also, time travel with castles, dungeons, dragons and more! There were many characters well-defined and realistic. Also, the scenes were portrayed very well so the reader was able to easily picture them occurring. My Review of this book offers a Five Stars rating. – LAWonder10

 

EXCERPT from THE SONS OF ELDERBERRY

In the fairy kingdom of Estraelia, the birth of a fairy is a spectacular event. It happens much like the Merwing, once every thousand years, when hundreds of infant fairies enter their world for the first time. Elieli beckoned for Elias and Samuel to follow her. They slipped away from the feast unnoticed, as the others continued talking and eating Elderberry pie, topped with swirls of white-lemon cream.

“Hurry! I want to show you something.” They followed her through the chamber and on through the ballroom, but instead of leaving the donjon the way the boys had entered, she took them down a long hallway, then up a narrow flight of circular stairs that tightly hugged the castle’s stone wall. The evening sky greeted them, as they neared the top of the sixth tower. Though they stepped out to a spectacular view of the woods and the tiny village far below, it was the stars that stood out the most. The heavens danced, as they twinkled brightly, setting off bursts of energy that filled the sky with gentle fireworks of bluish-white lights.

Samuel pointed to the sky. “What is this? I’ve never seen the stars look like that!”

“It is the Dance of the Fairies,” Elieli said, gazing up at them. “They do look like stars, don’t they?”

Samuel glanced from one shining orb to the next. “They are stars, Elieli. Aren’t they?”

“No,” she said, with a sigh, “not stars.” She looked at the boys then took a small, clear stone from her pocket and held it up to the shimmering display of lights. “Look!” she exclaimed, pointing through the stone to the lights.

“Wow!” Elias said, with a gasp. “It’s hundreds of wood fairies!” He could see them clearly now, even though they were in the sky—lifting their magnificent wings slowly up and down in beautiful, synchronized patterns of dance miles away.

Book Buy Links

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Wood-Fairies-Estraelia-Sons-Elderberry/dp/B01MR4QT6F/

Goodreads:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33958367-the-wood-fairies-of-estraelia?from_search=true

Rafflecopter Giveaway: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/330006f8281/

WANT MORE OF THERESA?

Official Facebook Event pagehttps://www.facebook.com/events/616599811870520/

website: www.theresasneed.com

Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/TheresaMSneed/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheresaSneed

Author email: tmsneed.author@yahoo.com

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/theresasneed/

 

 

 

 

 

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Robin Glassey comes for a visit with the last novel in her Azethra Series for YA

I welcome Robin Glassey to my humble abode and am excited to learn about her latest novel, Azetha Rising, the last novel in the Azetha Series. Before digging into her recent release, I wanted to know more about her and her writing process.

  • As children we tend to have an idea of what we want to be by the time we’re ten.  Before you decided to pursue the artistic dream of being a writer, what did you want to be and why?

What did I want to be before I was ten? Wow! That was a long time ago. I know my mom tried to convince me to be a nurse, but I couldn’t stand the sight of blood, I freaked out with minor toe bleeds. I’m pretty sure when I was a child I was dreaming of being a princess, but thinking if that didn’t pan out, I would become a teacher. I played school often with my friends (and, of course, Barbies). In high school, I had this crazy idea I was going to be an accountant. It was crazy because I was terrible in my regular math classes and fabulous in my accounting class.

  • We all have favorite characters, either main or secondary, and there are always bits and pieces of them we don’t share with our readers, but keep close to our hearts.  Choose your favorite from your cast of characters and tell us a couple of things that you haven’t shared in your books/writing.

This is so hard for me because I have so many favorites. I love so many characters and hold them close to my heart. But if we’re going for revelations that haven’t been shared, I choose Death, otherwise known as Tynan. Tynan pops in an out of my stories and has a unique sense of humor. Readers know that items have been stolen from Tynan such as the Cup of Death and the Veil of Death because of his weakness for drinking. What they don’t know is that Tynan fell in love with the sorceress, Shareena, and she tricked him into revealing to her all of his secrets. She then passed those secrets along to Mortan, who used the information to steal the Cup and the Veil from Death.

  • Growing up, what was your favorite book, comic, game or movie and did you create a character/player that might resemble you?

I had a couple of favorite movies when I was growing up that I saw at the local drive-in theater. The first was the original Star Wars and the second was Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. I fell in love with life on other planets, space travel, talking robots, Wookies, and I had a crush on Luke, Han Solo, and Buck. In one of my current works in progress I have created a character with some of my characteristics. The story takes place in 7th grade and so I looked back at my 7th grade self and inserted some of those characteristics into Alexa, as well as a brother that drives her crazy, and some unusual clothing gifted to her by her grandmother.

  • Whether we’re plotters or pantsers (outlines not needed), creating our stories takes us on very memorable journeys.  Sometimes we may be part way through before we realize some major aspect of our story is just not working (plot, character, setting).  Have you ever hit this sharp, pointy snag and if so, how did you escape? We’re you battered and bruised or a bloody mess?

I was at the end of book three in my series, Journey to the Mercy Mines, and I was really struggling with Rhallina, a minor character in the story, who plays an important role as a traitor. I had battled earlier in the story with a possible plot line that I’d thrown away and now I was at the end of the story, trying to kill her off. And I just couldn’t do it. I even had the scene written in my head with grass and flowers growing up through the snow over her grave, but I couldn’t go through with it. Because I was having such a hard time with the ending of the book, I set it aside and wrote the rough draft of another book called Snotty’s Revenge for a middle grade audience. Then I returned to the story with a fresh perspective and let Rhallina live. In the end, I loved how her fate worked out in the final book, Azetha Rising.

  • What is the best advice you can share with others? 

I have two pieces of advice: One—Never give up. There are going to be times when you want to give up whatever dream or goal you have set for yourself. We all experience years, months, days, even moments, when we think we don’t have it in us, when we are done, or when we are afraid that we just aren’t cut out for this. And I say . . . you can do this.

Two—Support your fellow authors. Share posts, tweet each other’s work, review books that you have read. Uplift each other and do what you can to cross-promote. As you support others you may be surprised to find your own sales and influence rising.

Rapid Fire Questions:

  • Blades, guns, fists or feet?       I would definitely pick feet. One of my older sisters and my younger brother would try to hold me down and tickle me when we were kids and I always fought them off with my feet. Although, come to think of it, the one time I went shooting I was really, really, good. So maybe guns wouldn’t be a bad choice.
  • Favorite Fairy Tale of all time?     I always loved the traditional fairytales so The Little Mermaid was one of my favorites, but even more fascinating and less well-known is a fairytale called The White Cat. It’s about a jealous king who fears his sons will ascend to the throne so he keeps them busy with difficult tasks, such as finding the smallest dog and linen so fine it can pass through the eye of a needle. One son comes upon an enchanted castle with a talking white cat who helps him to fulfill each of the tasks the king gives him.
  • Three titles and their authors sitting on your nightstand/bookcase/table/floor waiting to be read?       1. A Practical Guide to Dragon Magic Dungeons & Dragons 2.Utopia Thomas More 3.New Sight Jo Schnieder
  • Greatest one liner of all time?      “It is not a tumor,” from Kindergarten Cop. I don’t know why my husband and I quote this all the time when someone gets sick, or has a headache in our house, but we do, accent and all.
  • Sarcastic witticism, Southern sweetness or Geeky disdain?     How about Northern sweet and occasional Sarcastic Geek. That about sums me up.
  • Strangest item currently taking up space in your writing cave?      The Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells. I bought this giant book a long time ago as research for my series, along with an encyclopedia of monsters. I had it sitting on my stairs this one day when the piano tuner came over to work on the piano. He looked at the book and then looked at me, giving me a funny sideways look. But he didn’t say a word, and I almost burst out laughing.
  • Favorite supernatural creature?     Dragons are beautiful, fierce creatures that also come in a variety of colors, types, sizes and temperaments. I love to read dragon stories, watch dragon movies, and I just recently bought a gorgeous dragon pen on Kauai. I’m currently working on a dragon story, hence the Practical Guide to Dragon Magic on my nightstand as part of my research.

 

Azetha Risingrobin-glassey-cover-azetha-rising

THINGS HAVEN’T GONE THE WAY TIKA HOPED OR PLANNED.

Yes, she has passed the Prime Council’s test and has been accepted into the il Alluminon House, but Death has been breathing down her neck. She’s been betrayed by her fellow countrymen, captured and collared, and forced to fight her best friend in Sicor’s Arena.

Then there is the matter of Mortan. While other 16 year olds are busy courting and attending festivals, Tika is trying to evade the Elven sorcerer’s deadly plans for her demise. Maybe Tika is the promised Azetha, and maybe she isn’t. But even if she is and manages to learn to control her powers in time, will she be strong enough to defeat Mortan, or will he become ruler of Fathara forever?

Azetha Rising is the last book in The Azetha Series—a cross between Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings and Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time for a YA audience.

Purchase Robin’s books on AMAZON   or enter the Goodreads Giveaway HERE

ALL ABOUT ROBIN GLASSEY

Robin grew up in Canada across the bay from a leaky nuclear power plant, giving her the not so secret power of deactivating electronic devices.  She moved to Utah in 1994 to attend BYU and fell hopelessly in love with Brett Glassey (although he has not fallen in love with BYU).

Robin admits to having several imaginary friends as a child, including a giant who protected her from the Sleestaks that lived in their basement. The Sleestaks have all moved out and now Robin writes clean YA fantasy novels, including the now completed Azetha Series.

WANT MORE ROBIN? 

Find her at her author page: robinglassey.squarespace.com  ,  or on Twitter @RobinGlassey

 

 

 

Why We Love Tragedies.

I’ve recently finished binge watching The Gilmore Girls, and yes, I’m a few years behind the times. (X-files was more of my love when I was a teenager.) With the witty banter and romance, I can see why Gilmore Girls is so popular. But when looking at the show, I see it for what it is, a tragedy. By the end of the show (I’m referring to the original, though the new Year in the Life applies as well), Lorelei has ruined her chance at happiness with only the promise of a kiss with Luke. Given her previous history with love, it isn’t much. Rory, while finally graduated from college, also loses in love and only has a promise of a low paying journalist job. The show is definitely missing its Happily Ever After.  I can keep complaining about the girls’ poor choices and week parenting, but I was glued to the show like everyone else.

Then why do we watch? Is it the promise that somehow, they’ll pull their lives together? Maybe in the hopes that Lorelei will one day make a commitment or that Rory will go for the too good to be true rich boy, Logan.  Maybe we watch because real life is more complicated that a simple fairy tale.

I look at another tragedy, one of my favorite novels, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In the end, his life is over, everything and everyone he knew is gone. The only hope is a small group of old scholars that go around, sharing the books they’ve memorized. They have no chance at freeing their ignorant society or over throwing their government. They live in the misery of their knowledge, with barely a hope. I love that small hope.

Like Shakespeare himself, tragedies span the history of storytelling.  Maybe we revel in the pain and suffering of tragedies, because we can relate to them. Life is ugly, messy, and complicated. We make stupid mistakes and have to suffer through them.

In these tragedies, though, the characters also find happiness and humor in small bits of joy and love, and in those small kernels, we may find the reason for this life.

Tragedies remind me to find the pleasure in the path ahead however challenging. Like Lorelei, we can rip open ten different bags of candy and watch an old movie, criticizing their judgments and escaping our own reality for a time.

While we each experience our own tragedies, small or large, I hope we can find joy in the journey and peace in the quiet times, and maybe we even experience a happily ever after now and again.

SPOILER ALERT: If you have finished the Year in the Life on Netflix, I love to hear your thoughts, and maybe your guess on the father.

 

What can Novelist Learn from the Movies?

I recently read the book Save the Cat by Blake Snyder , a must have for screenwriters and all story tellers. As I’ve been reading, and going over notes from my last conference, I realize there is much we can learn from TV and movies.

  1. Dialogue: This is the most obvious of course, but TV/Movies are littered with good, and bad, dialogue. It is a great way to hear what works and what doesn’t. Aprilynne Pike recently said that she thinks her writing is better when watching Gilmore Girls. I agree it is a witty show that does a great job with dialogue. And as writers, I think it’s important to read our dialogue out loud to help edit our work.
  1. Plotting: Because of the short length of movies (in comparison to sitting down and reading an 80,000 word novel), movies are a great way to look at the plot of a story and see what works. Most movies follow a formula, and those that don’t struggle. Blake Snyder goes over plotting in his book for screenwriting, and it mirrors a lot of what I’ve read from other writing books as well. Usually you can watch the major plot points happen like clockwork.
  1. Characters: Watching Pulp Fiction and seeing how Quentin Tarantino makes two drug addicted hit-men likeable is amazing. Whether creating an anti-hero or making secondary characters memorable (I think of Second Hand Lions), TV and movies are great examples.

So don’t feel guilty next time your binge watching your favorite series. Think about what makes the show work for your or where it can improve. Ignore the guilt and chalk it up to homework.

Upcoming Release: LOVE IS DEATH by LP Masters

L.P. Masters has crafted an exciting paranormal romance that both young adults and adults will enjoy. Filled with realistic characters and an intriguing plot, Love is Death offers readers a tantalizing experience that will keep them on the edge of their seats. Masters’ view of the afterlife and beyond is unique and fascinating, making you wonder what truly does come next. Masters has done a wonderful job, and I look forward to reading more of her books in the future. — by Miranda Miller of Editing Realm

 

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                            LOVE IS DEATH: BOOK 1 OF THE AFTERDEATH SERIES                                                Love is Death will be released November 16, 2016. Pre-order Information Here 
Rest in Peace? What a joke. Ghosts rarely rest, and when we do, it’s never in peace.
Gina’s plan for her afterlife is simple: survive as long as possible. The afterlife is a ghost-kill-ghost kind of place. When she meets newly-dead Alec, she can’t help her desire to protect him. Before she knows it, she finds herself falling for him, despite the little voice in her head telling her it’s a bad idea.
Alec’s goals don’t mesh well with Gina’s plans. Determined to save his living sister from a murderer, he’s willing to disobey the laws of a well-established cult in the afterlife. If the cult finds out, they’ll kill him. Again. He’s hesitant to accept Gina’s help and threaten her afterlife, but he’s guaranteed to fail without her. Together they embark on a perilous mission, but the most dangerous aspect of all is the threat of falling in love. Because in the afterlife…love is death.

Read an Excerpt

“Hey,” I said softly. “What’s going on?”
He bit his lower lip and shook his head. “Nothing.”
He was lying. Something was bothering him, and that was dangerous.
I heard a rare sound: birdsong, but it was clear, not muffled, which meant it was a ghost. I searched for it. There!
“Look, quick.” I pointed at the ghost of a black-capped chickadee a few feet away.
Alec smiled. The little bird twittered in its usual way and hopped across the grass, head turning in jerks like birds always do. It took wing, and I knew what that meant.
“Watch,” I whispered.
In the middle of a flap the bird disappeared. Its water dropped and splashed on the grass, and for a moment the afterghost continued to fly, swooping and twisting in the air before it disappeared as well.
“What the…?” Alec looked shocked.
“Birds don’t stay in the afterlife. Not for long.”
“Why not?”
“Soul sickness. They get here, realize there is nothing like them around, and they get sick.” I held my breath. “The same can happen to you if you’re upset about something.”
Alec looked me in the eyes. His stare was intense, as if he wanted to tell me something. Then he tore his gaze away. “I’ll be fine, Gina.”
I wanted to swear. He wouldn’t be fine. I could see it. I could feel it. He was going to die again if he couldn’t get himself out of that mood.

LP Masters

Born and raised ileannn the rainy streets of the Seattle Area, L.P. Masters spent her fair share of time staring out rain-streaked windows and writing novels. Masters has always had extremely vivid dreams, which often spark inspiration for her novels.
In 1999, after one such dream, Masters began writing her first novel. She has participated in National Novel Writer’s Month every November since 2010. Writing isn’t the only thing she can do with a pen in her hand, she also enjoys sketching and drawing—with varying degrees of success.
Masters now lives in the slightly-less-dreary city of Spokane Washington with her husband and two wonderful daughters.
Connect with L.P. Masters!  www.lpmasters.com  Facebook: /lpmastersauthor Twitter: @https://twitter.com/CXVI116

Filling your writing toolbox with books

Many a handyman will say that without their toolbox, the work can’t be done. Writers are the same. We fill our toolbox with a variety of tools. We may pick these up at conferences, writing groups, or even blogs (wink, wink). Some of my favorite places to find those gems are books. Great writing books help me look at my writing in a whole different light.

emotion-thesaurus

 

The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi. I use this book most frequently and keep it at my desk when writing. Definitely a must have. They also have several others that are worth purchasing.

 

James Scott Bell has so many great books on writing it was hard for me to pick only one, so I didn’t.dialogue-book

How to Write Dazzling Dialogue: The Fasted Way to Improve Any Manuscript

 

conflict-book

 

Conflict and Suspense

 

 

save-the-cat

 

Save The Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Black Synder. While about screenwriting, this book covers essential elements on storytelling that every author can use.

 

story-engineering

Story Engineering by Larry Brooks has a great comprehension books on the essential building blocks of a story.

 

 

I’m in the middle of another craft book, so this list may grow. Do you have any that I have missed? Please let me know.

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Digging for Characters

I recently read Cannery Row by John Steinbeck. I’m a fan of Steinbeck, but have to admit I struggled with the beginning of this book. It was full of description: describing places, houses, people and even a couple pages on the Model T truck. By page 34, I wasn’t sure what the plot was. Halfway through the novel, I realized how this Nobel Peace Prize Winning Author continues to draw me in—characters.

There are over two handfuls of unique, interesting characters in this book. While writing, I often want to reach for clique or average, especially in secondary characters. I want to challenge myself to dig deeper for those unique personalities that we love to read about.

Here’s an example of a secondary character, Gay, in Cannery Row that only participates for thirty five pages. While I don’t remember the color of his hair or body type, I won’t forget this story anytime soon.

 

Doc asked, “How are things going up at the Palace?”

Hazel ran his fingers through his dark hair and he peered into the clutter of his mind.          “Pretty good,” he said. “That fellow Gay is moving in with us I guess. His wife hits him        pretty bad. He don’t mind that when he’s awake but she waits ‘til he gets to sleep and          then hits him. He hates that. He has to wake up and beat her up and then when he goes      back to sleep she hits him again. He don’t get any rest so he’s moving in with us.”

“That’s a new one,” said Doc. “She used to swear out a warrant and put him in jail.”

“Yeah!” said Hazel. “But that was before they built the new jail in Salinas. Used to be           thirty days and Gay was pretty hot to get out, but this new jail—radio in the tank and             good bunks and the sheriff’s a nice fellow. Gay gets in there and he don’t want to come         out. He likes it so much his wife won’t get him arrested any more. So she figured out this     hitting him while he’s asleep.  It’s nerve racking, he says. And you know as good as me         —Gay never did take any pleasure beating her up. He only done it to keep his self-                respect. But he gets tired of it. I guess he’ll be with us now.”

 

Steinbeck paints gritty characters that stick with us. Two dimensional characters are easy, like neighbors that we wave to while our garage shuts. There is more out there, let’s tip over their trash and see who they really are. Let’s keep digging.

Feed Your Muse

I love to write. I don’t know why anyone would pick this profession for any other reason. A month ago though, the dark monsters of the swamp came out to haunt me. You know the ones with those killer claws: stress, anxiety, and insecurity.  And with writing content articles and editing my current novel, writing had morphed into some twisted self-deprecating job.

I needed a break. I needed to close my computer for a few days and feed my muse.

It was difficult at first to shut down the nagging voices telling me to be productive. But I closed my laptop, packed my bags, and escape to the country.

I went for walks. Got caught in the rain. Read for enjoyment. Mother Nature calmed my soul and left my imagination free to play.

Not everyone is not able to run away, but we still need to make time for ourselves and, as ted talksElizabeth Gilbert referred to it, Our Elusive Creative Genius.  In this TED talks, she explains that when we see our muse, or creative genius, as something outside of us, then it is easier to maintain our sanity.  It is worth the time to watch.

I enjoy thinking of my muse as a separate identity or creative genius. One we must feed and nurture in the hope that it’s won’t torment us.

How do you feed your muse?

The Brothers Grimm

 

Every now and again, I like to dip into history and non-fiction. I find the change of pace welcoming and what I learn always intriguing. My most recent read was The Brothers Grimm: Two Lives, One Legacy by Donald R. Hettinga.

Jacob and Wilhem Grimm are most popular for combing the German countryside for fables and legends and publishing them. Disney has made a mint on several of their stories such as Snow White or Sleeping Beauty. But the story behind their lives was a true and interesting tale woven with kings, queens, and even revolution. The brothers Grimm preserved these ancient tales and also the German language with their books on linguistics.

My favorite part was when a critic of their first published book of stories complained that they were too graphic and disturbing for children. Jacob (the elder brother) responded that grew him up with his mother telling him the tale of How Some Children Played at Slaughtering, to show him the dangers of playing, and it worked for him. The story is about children who pretended to play slaughtering pigs and ended up killing their playmates. Fantastically morbid, I know, but part of me is still intrigued enough to read it. Wilhem Grimm’s take in response to the critics was also noteworthy: “You can fool yourself into thinking that what can be removed from a book can also be removed from real life.”

The Grimm brothers survived many political regimes and Napoleon’s conquests that sent soldiers into the streets outside their house. They dealt with poverty and death. By the end of their lives, their work and contributions were celebrated and revered. They spent their last days together, as a family.

I’ll leave you with one of my favorite quotes from the book: “In a grain of sand we may see the sense and significance of large globes of which our world is one of the smallest.” Jacob Grimm

Ten Commandments of Reading

The other day while my son was reading book four of the Michael Vay series, skipping book two and three since we’re waiting for them from our library, I decided he needed to learn some very basic rules of reading. So in my horrific English accent, I proceeded to the commandments of reading.

  The Ten Commandments of Reading

  1. Never tell the end of a good book to a friend.
  2. Read the book before the movie, except if the movie is Princess Bride.
  3. If you’re in a used bookstore, you must buy a book. Unless you’re dead broke, then go to the library.
  4. You should always have a library card.
  5. Always read a series in order, unless there are too many to keep count. Then go crazy.
  6. If a friend lends you a book and you accidentally damage it, replace it.
  7. Don’t break the binding of a book or damage a book, no matter how you detest it. Get a bookmark people, even a sock will do.
  8. If you interrupt someone during a good part of a book you must recite the alphabet backwards, while standing on your head. (Parents are the only exception for underage children, and a fire because the safety of a book comes first.)
  9. No skipping to the end of a book. Yes, you know who you are.
  10. When reciting the commandments, please use your best snooty English accent.

library card

When my daughter broke rule one as my son was reading Harry Potter, I thought she’d catch on fire with that blasphemy. And I recommend two library cards, in case of emergencies.

What is your pet peeve when reading?  Let me know. While these may be etched in stone, like every writer knows, the edits never stop.